Hawker and Hall Family Trees

Notes


Reginald Thomas Hawker

Identification of people in the photograph of the wedding of Reginald Thomas and Cecilia, provided by Gladys Hawker his sister:
Left to Right: Children at front: Eva, sister of Cecilia; Billy; Alice.
Front Row: Thomas Hawker (Father of RTH); Lilly; Reginald Thomas; Cecilia; unknown man (1); Anne Ward.
Rear: 5 unknown women; George Hawker (brother of Reginald Thomas); 2 unknown women; unknown man; Cecilia Shakespeare (mother of Cecilia Clarke); Aunt of RTH; unknown woman.


Cecilia Clarke

According to John Hawker (brother of George, Tom, Glad and Anne) Cecilia was born in Clee Hills.


Charles Fred Perkins

Email dated 12/12/2002 to Graham George Hawker from Anthony John Haywood:

Hello again... I've listed some of the background details for Mom and Glad
and Charles, some of which you may have others you may no
1.Cecilia Ann Hawker ( note no e on the Ann on the birth cert ) 10/08/1908,
46 Wolverhampton Road, Walsall, Staffs. Birth registered on the 14th August.
2. Charles Fred Perkins 18/11/1903 at 20 Dalkeith Street, Walsall, Staffs.
Father Charles Perkins ( Tinner .. Journeyman ) Mother Sarah Perkins formerly
Cook, registered on the 13th January.
3. Gladys Jane Hawker 20/04/1906, 153 Bentley Lane, Walsall. Father and
Mother known, birth registered on 23rd. May 1906.
4. John Benjamin Haywood, 10.02/1907, Brunswick Park Road, Wednesbury,
Staffs.
Father, Benjamin Haywood ( Machine Fitter ), Mother Margaret Pamela Naomi (
nee Styles ), birth registered on 12th March.
5. Marriage of John Benjamin to Cecilia Anne ( e added now ), 06/09/1937 at
St Peters Church Walsall, John aged 30 years Anne aged 28 years. John lived
at 44 Oxford St. Wednesbury and Anne at 91 Pargeter St. Walsall. John's
father now an Engineer. Witnessed by Gladys and Reginald Thomas Hawker.
6. Marriage of Charles Fred to Gladys Jane at The Parish Church of St Andrew,
Walsall, on 15/08/1940. Gladys aged 34 Charles aged 36. Charles Fred was a
Progess Manager, from 20 Dalkeith St. Walsall. Father as above. Witnessed by
George Hawker and Winifred Mary Roster. Winifred is shown on the photos of
Glad's wedding as the one Bridesmaid the other was your Mom.
7. Death of Gladys Jane Hawker, 01/04/2000 at Field House Rest Home, Clent,
near Stourbridge, Worcs. Cause Old age and dementia. My name is the informant
on the certificate.
8. Death of Cecilia Anne Haywood, 05/04/1993 at Kidderminster General
Hospital, Cardiac failure, Gangrene of the small bowel.
9. Death of Giles Stewart Haywood, 02/02/1997 at Filletts farm, Six ashes,
Quatt, Shropshire. ( Born 06/08/1945 ) Cause by Asphyxia from hanging.
10. Death of John Benjamin Haywood, 01/04/1965, at Queen Mary's Hospital,
West Ham,aged 58 years. Cause Coronary Occlusion. Winessed by his brother


John Benjamin Haywood

Email dated 12/12/2002 to Graham George Hawker from Anthony John Haywood:

Hello again... I've listed some of the background details for Mom and Glad
and Charles, some of which you may have others you may no
1.Cecilia Ann Hawker ( note no e on the Ann on the birth cert ) 10/08/1908,
46 Wolverhampton Road, Walsall, Staffs. Birth registered on the 14th August.
2. Charles Fred Perkins 18/11/1903 at 20 Dalkeith Street, Walsall, Staffs.
Father Charles Perkins ( Tinner .. Journeyman ) Mother Sarah Perkins formerly
Cook, registered on the 13th January.
3. Gladys Jane Hawker 20/04/1906, 153 Bentley Lane, Walsall. Father and
Mother known, birth registered on 23rd. May 1906.
4. John Benjamin Haywood, 10.02/1907, Brunswick Park Road, Wednesbury,
Staffs.
Father, Benjamin Haywood ( Machine Fitter ), Mother Margaret Pamela Naomi (
nee Styles ), birth registered on 12th March.
5. Marriage of John Benjamin to Cecilia Anne ( e added now ), 06/09/1937 at
St Peters Church Walsall, John aged 30 years Anne aged 28 years. John lived
at 44 Oxford St. Wednesbury and Anne at 91 Pargeter St. Walsall. John's
father now an Engineer. Witnessed by Gladys and Reginald Thomas Hawker.
6. Marriage of Charles Fred to Gladys Jane at The Parish Church of St Andrew,
Walsall, on 15/08/1940. Gladys aged 34 Charles aged 36. Charles Fred was a
Progess Manager, from 20 Dalkeith St. Walsall. Father as above. Witnessed by
George Hawker and Winifred Mary Roster. Winifred is shown on the photos of
Glad's wedding as the one Bridesmaid the other was your Mom.
7. Death of Gladys Jane Hawker, 01/04/2000 at Field House Rest Home, Clent,
near Stourbridge, Worcs. Cause Old age and dementia. My name is the informant
on the certificate.
8. Death of Cecilia Anne Haywood, 05/04/1993 at Kidderminster General
Hospital, Cardiac failure, Gangrene of the small bowel.
9. Death of Giles Stewart Haywood, 02/02/1997 at Filletts farm, Six ashes,
Quatt, Shropshire. ( Born 06/08/1945 ) Cause by Asphyxia from hanging.
10. Death of John Benjamin Haywood, 01/04/1965, at Queen Mary's Hospital,
West Ham,aged 58 years. Cause Coronary Occlusion. Winessed by his brother
James Samuel Haywood MBE.

Worked at Elwells and was an accomplished cricketer
Was finance director of BSR (Birmingham Sound Reproductions)


Thomas Hawker

Email received on Sunday 17th October 1999 from John Hawker by his brother Graham George, after John Hawker saw a copy of this GEDCOM file dated 15 October 1999 states:

"I talked the history through with Father and he had a few comments that may be of interest.

His grandfather Thomas lived with the Ellis family when he first moved from Gloucester to the
Midlands in the 1870's. Francis Ellis was a Baker who was married to Ellen. They had 3 sons,
Francis, Ernest and George and a daughter Ellen. I have a scrap of paper in Father's awful
handwriting that says they appear in the Walsall census return for 1881 at 51 Colmore Green. I
don't know how Thomas came to live with the Ellis family or whether they were already known
to the Hawker family before he moved."


1891 Census, looked up by Wendy Doyle:

90 GREEN LANE WALSALL

HAWKER THOMAS H M 31 GROCER/BAKER WORCS ELDERSFIELD
ANN W M 34 " COALPOOL
REGINALD T. S 8 SCHOLAR WALSALL
GEORGE S 7 " "
LILLIAN B D 4 "
ELLAN A D 2 "
WILLIAM H S 1 "
JAMES S 2MO "
HILL FRANK SHOPMAN U 20 GROCERS SHOPMAN WORCS GUINTON
MALLARD ALICE SERV U 14 GENERAL SERVANT BONEY HAY
HADDON SARAH VISITOR M 41 - SHROPS. BROMSTALL HEATH


Thomas Hawker

Email received on Sunday 17th October 1999 from John Hawker by his brother Graham George, after John Hawker saw a copy of this GEDCOM file dated 15 October 1999 states:

"I talked the history through with Father and he had a few comments that may be of interest.

His grandfather Thomas lived with the Ellis family when he first moved from Gloucester to the
Midlands in the 1870's. Francis Ellis was a Baker who was married to Ellen. They had 3 sons,
Francis, Ernest and George and a daughter Ellen. I have a scrap of paper in Father's awful
handwriting that says they appear in the Walsall census return for 1881 at 51 Colmore Green. I
don't know how Thomas came to live with the Ellis family or whether they were already known
to the Hawker family before he moved."


1891 Census, looked up by Wendy Doyle:

90 GREEN LANE WALSALL

HAWKER THOMAS H M 31 GROCER/BAKER WORCS ELDERSFIELD
ANN W M 34 " COALPOOL
REGINALD T. S 8 SCHOLAR WALSALL
GEORGE S 7 " "
LILLIAN B D 4 "
ELLAN A D 2 "
WILLIAM H S 1 "
JAMES S 2MO "
HILL FRANK SHOPMAN U 20 GROCERS SHOPMAN WORCS GUINTON
MALLARD ALICE SERV U 14 GENERAL SERVANT BONEY HAY
HADDON SARAH VISITOR M 41 - SHROPS. BROMSTALL HEATH


Ann Ward

Sister of Thomas Hawker's first wife. Marriage therefore void under the 1835 Lyndhurst Act. However, the Deceased Wife's Sister's Marriage Act 1907 made the marriage valid retrospectively.

The following extract was taken (1 Sept 2002) from "The Regency Collection" on the internet at address:
http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~awoodley/regency/marry.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Marriage to Deceased Wife's sister
The prohibition on marrying your brother's wife comes from an Old Testament text: "If a man shall take his brother's wife, it is an impurity: he hath uncovered his brother's nakedness; they shall be childless." (Leviticus xx,21.) Now you might well notice that this could easily mean don't take your brother's wife _while he is alive_, but the medieval church interpreted it to mean that people could not marry their deceased spouse's sibling, at all and because the church did grant dispensations from the prohibition.
There was no outright civil ban on these marriages in England although they were certainly discouraged, until the The Marriage Act of 1835. Up until this date these marriages were considered voidable (meaning either party could use the relationship as a reason to annul the marriage - or indeed anyone else might do so if they felt so moved) but were not void.
The case of Charles Austen, the younger brother of Jane Austen is an example of this. In 1814 his first wife, Frances Palmer, died in childbirth. Being a naval officer, he left his surviving three daughters in the care of his wife's older sister Harriet. In 1817, Charles was returned to shore for several years (he did not get another ship until 1826.) In 1820, he and Harriet were married, and remained married for 32 years, until his death in 1852; Harriet died in 1869. They had 4 children, three sons and a daughter. After his marriage, Charles continued to rise in the navy without prejudice because of his marriage; in fact he captained several different ships, was named a Companion of the Bath in 1840, became a rear-admiral in 1846, and was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the East India and China Station in 1850. By then, of course, his marriage with Harriet had been officially sanctioned by the 1835 Marriage Act which closed the possibility of it being challenged under Canonical Law and made void. While it doesn't appear either her father or Charles' father opposed the marriage, it is suggested that the couple did go to France to be married.
Lady Holland perhaps best illustrates the situation commenting the Marquis of Worcester's marriage to his wife's half sister, Emily Frances Smith. They had to marry in Europe, but this was no guarantee that their marriage would not be voided. "The Duchess of Beaufort (Lord Worcester's mother) has had an amiable interview wtih Lord Worcester, & invited Lady Worcester to England. Her religious scruples have taken a turn; but the marriage is still libale to be dissolved any day by an ill-natured person." (from "Lady Holland's Lettters To Her Son". Edited by Lord Ilchester. John Murray, London, 1946. Page 26, April 21, 1824.)
There was not universal supprt for these marriages though, Maria Edgeworth's father was forced to wait for sometime to marry his deceased wife's sister in late eighteenth century Ireland while a clergyman was found who would marry them.
In fact there are instances of these marriages being voided. This is from the March 1810 issue of La Belle Assemblee, under Incidents Occurring In and Near London pp 152-155: "Feb. 27. This day a cause of nullity of marriage brought by Charlotte Aughtie, widow, late wife of William Aughtie, of the parish of St. Mary-le-bow, London by reason of affinity, was decided in the Arches Court. It appeared by the evidence produced, that Gabriel Aughtie, the former husband of Charlotte Aughtie, and William Aughtie (the party now proceeded against) were own brothers. It also appeared by the former marriage, there were issue ten children, five of whom were still living, and by the latter marriage one child. These facts together with other necessary facts, being satisfactorily proved, the court observed, it had no difficulty whatever in pronouncing this to have been an unlawful marriage and thereby pronounced it accordingly."
By the 1830's, eminent people who had contracted these marriages and feared they might later be declared void, sought to have their position stabilized and a bill was introduced by Lord Lyndhurst to regularize them. The bill that was passed in 1835 enacted that "all marriages which shall hereafter be celebrated between persons within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity or affinity shall be absolutely null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever." At the same time the act did legalize all marriages within the prohibited degrees of affinity (i.e. with deceased wife's sister) that had been celebrated before August 31, 1835. That meant that all those eminent people (and their children) were safe.
It was only any later marriages, after the date of the marriage act which were void. Beginning in the 1860's, bills were introduced in Parliament just about annually to allow marriage with deceased wife's sister; it finally passed in 1907. The issue prompted the classic line from Gilbert and Sullivan's operetta 'Iolanthe' - "We will prick that annual blister, marriage to deceased wife's sister". In 1907 they finally managed to repeal at least half of it. The Deceased Wife's Sister's Marriage act of 28 August that year made it possible to marry one's sister-in-law. Yet it wasn't until 1921 that the Deceased Brother's Widow's Marriage Act was passed which made marriage to a brother-in-law legal.
(Reference "The Dictionary of Dates, Everyman's Library, JM Dent and Sons. 1940.) Charles Austen's case wasn't unique. There were a lot of widowers who wanted to marry their sisters-in-law-- it was often she who came to care for her nieces and nephews, and therefore was available.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------


The photo in the scrapbook was sent by Jean Wint, wife of Ron Wint, to Graham George Hawker on 10 March 2002 via her son-in-law Fraser Simpson


James Hawker

According to John Hawker (Brother of George, Tom, Glad and Anne) Jimmy Hawker had mental health problems.

Email received on Sunday 17th October 1999 from John Hawker by his brother Graham George, after John Hawker saw a copy of this GEDCOM file dated 15 October 1999 states:

"I talked the history through with Father and he had a few comments that may be of interest.
James (Jimmy) , Thomas's son by his second marriage, had some sort of tragic accident in
his late teens or early twenties which severely damaged one or both of his hands. He never
worked and was so traumatised by the accident he became rather strange. He never married
because of it, and lived at home with Thomas, and when Thomas died he lived with Alice."

An email received by Graham George on 7 February 2002 from Jean Wint (wife of Ron Wint) stated:
"Ron says that the accident occurred when Jimmy had "pinched" a bottle of whiskey and running away, tripped over the shafts of a cart and cut an artery. Jimmy lived with his unmarried sister Alice until she died when he went to live with Bill Hawker's wife, Tot."


Alice Jane Hawker

Email received on Sunday 17th October 1999 from John Hawker by his brother Graham George, after John Hawker saw a copy of this GEDCOM file dated 15 October 1999 states:

"I talked the history through with Father and he had a few comments that may be of interest.
...

Alice Jane, Thomas's daughter by his second marriage, never married and lived at home with
Thomas and Anne Ward. She looked after them until they died and she lived at Park Road
near Skip Lane."


Benjamin Thomas Barrick

Email received on Sunday 17th October 1999 from John Hawker by his brother Graham George, after John Hawker saw a copy of this GEDCOM file dated 15 October 1999 states:

I talked the history through with Father and he had a few comments that may be of interest.
 
His grandfather Thomas lived with the Ellis family when he first moved from Gloucester to the
Midlands in the 1870's. Francis Ellis was a Baker who was married to Ellen. They had 3 sons,
Francis, Ernest and George and a daughter Ellen.  I have a scrap of paper in Father's awful
handwriting that says they appear in the Walsall census return for 1881 at 51 Colmore Green. I
don't know how Thomas came to live with the Ellis family or whether they were already known
to the Hawker family before he moved.
 
Thomas's son George by his first marriage had a son Robert. Robert joined the Navy in the
War and by some extraordinary coincidence there is an elderly lady at Uvedale Court who
knew him very well and used to play tennis with him. She may have some useful background,
but I need to be sure that he really is the right Robert as she is very ancient and could be
confusing him with another, though interestingly she seems to know many of the Hawkers that
Father remembers who must be his Uncles and Aunts.
 
Lillian Blanche, Thomas's daughter by his second marriage married Benjamin Barrick.
Benjamin worked for Thomas and asked his permission to marry Lillian. Thomas was not too
keen and advised him to make his fortune before asking again.  Benjamin moved to the US and
returned with sufficient income for Thomas to agree to the marriage. Lillian and Benjamin
moved to the US. I believe you may have made contact with their grandchildren.
 
James (Jimmy) , Thomas's son by his second marriage, had some sort of tragic accident in
his late teens or early twenties which severely damaged one or both of his hands. He never
worked and was so traumatised by the accident he became rather strange.  He never married
because of it, and lived at home with Thomas, and when Thomas died he lived with Alice (see
below).
 
Arthur Cecil (pronounced Ceecil), Thomas's son by his second marriage, married Ivy Hall.
When Ceecil died Ivy married ( our Granny) Celia Clarke's brother.
 
Ellen Augusta, Thomas's daughter by his second marriage, married Harold Wint. Harold
worked for Thomas Hawker.
 
Alice Jane, Thomas's daughter by his second marriage, never married and lived at home with
Thomas and Anne Ward. She looked after them until they died and she lived at Park Road
near Skip Lane.
 
Father said that during the war he lost touch with a lot of his cousins. Interestingly he says he
remembers William Darke who was his grandfathers brother in law.
 
I have a press cutting of Thomas Hawkers obit from the local paper dated 1926 and a rather
good picture. He left £250,000.00.  I have a good photograph of Father's Father Reginald
Thomas and his wife and Glad as a tiny baby. They look very Edwardian and very formal. I have
a very good photo of Reginal Thomas as a young man, late teens probably. He looks very
grand and obviously well off. I have another photo of Reginal Thomas taken just before the war.
He looks a lot like Father.  I can send these as high resolution JPEG or TIFF's if you want.
 
Jean Tomkins should have a lot more detail.


Lillian Blanche Hawker

See: http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/b/a/r/Ellen-R-Barrick/index.html

The caption on the photograph on Lillian standing by her son's car, which is in the scrapbook page for Lillian, was emailed to Graham George Hawker by Tom and Ellen Anne Barrick as follows:
"This photo is of Lillian standing beside George's (her son) Ford car in 1934 at their home in Lynbrook, Long Island, NY. Lillian wrote on the back, "Dear Sister, Just a snap of me standing by George's new car, it's a Ford. I must say it takes you long enough to answer a letter. Love, Lil".
We think she sent this back to her sister Alice, in England and then recovered it at a later date, perhaps when Alice died.
Enjoy!
Tom & Ellen Anne"


George Thomas Hawker Barrick

In an email to Graham George Hawker on 24 April 2001 Tom and Ellen Anne Barrick <ellibear42@hotmail.com> wrote:
"Graham,

We received your message and are glad you are enjoying the pictures.
We have sent you all we have of Thomas Hawker.

This one is of Lillian, her husband Benjamin and son George Thomas Hawker
Barrick (Tom's father) that we believe was taken in 1917 when George was 3
years old.

We have George's Baptismal Certificate which shows his full given name to be
George Thomas Hawker Barrick. Also, the baby picture of George that was
included in message #1 has this full name written on the bottom of it in
Lily's handwriting. Although my father did not use the "Hawker" in his name
for most of his life, he discovered that it was there and started using the
full name during his mid 40's.

Regards, Tom"

The photo of Lillian, Benjamin and George can be seen in the web page scrapbook for Benjamin.

The letter from Thomas Hawker to George Thomas Hawker Barrick (see scrapbook pages) have been transcribed by Tom and Ellen Anne Barrick as follows:
"Nov. 16, 1918

My Dear Grand Child
I write this the first letter to you not that you have ever seen me but I do hope your Mother and Father has told you about your Grand Pa over the water and I expect you wonder what sort of funny man I shall be when you see me. I hope you will not be very disappointed when you do. I write because of the signing of the Armistice been signed when men of all nations cease killing one another and the prospect of a glorious peace. When you get a
big man you will remember what your Mother and Father tell you about this terrible war because I remember when I was only 3 years and you are 4 years old now. I am send you a present and your Mother must buy you something seasonable and to remember peace when you grow up. And I do hope you will grow up a good boy and do what your Mother and Father tells you. Then you will grow up a good and strong man.

I am your affectionate Grand Father
T. Hawker

The story of Mildred and her brother George is rather sad, and was provided by Ellen Anne Barrick to Graham George Hawker on 2 May 2001 by email as follows:
"Mildred's story is a sad one indeed. I will have to search through some
more of my papers to see if I can come up with the name of the facility.
The truth is that Lillian left money to both George and Mildred in her will
with the stipulation that they would receive it on their 50th birthdays.
George was about 40 and Mildred was about 32 when Lillian died. Both George
and Mildred pretty much wasted the years waiting to turn 50 and getting
their inheritance. While George used his to buy a meat market, he really
wasn't a good businessman and he soon lost his investment. George took his
own life in 1968 just two month before Tom and I married. Mildred was
younger than George and so her wait was a bit longer and she evidently was
not wise at relationships and Mr. Anderson turned out to want the
inheritance also and when she turned 50 he took it and fled. There were no
children from either of Mildred's marriages. It is a sad scenario for both
of Lillian's children."


Mildred Alice Barrick

The story of Mildred and her brother George is rather sad, and was provided by Ellen Anne Barrick to Graham George Hawker on 2 May 2001 by email as follows:
"Mildred's story is a sad one indeed. I will have to search through some
more of my papers to see if I can come up with the name of the facility.
The truth is that Lillian left money to both George and Mildred in her will
with the stipulation that they would receive it on their 50th birthdays.
George was about 40 and Mildred was about 32 when Lillian died. Both George
and Mildred pretty much wasted the years waiting to turn 50 and getting
their inheritance. While George used his to buy a meat market, he really
wasn't a good businessman and he soon lost his investment. George took his
own life in 1968 just two month before Tom and I married. Mildred was
younger than George and so her wait was a bit longer and she evidently was
not wise at relationships and Mr. Anderson turned out to want the
inheritance also and when she turned 50 he took it and fled. There were no
children from either of Mildred's marriages. It is a sad scenario for both
of Lillian's children."


Ivy Hall

John Hawker, brother of George,Tom, Glad and Anne, told Graham George Hawker that Ivy initially married Cecil Hawker and then later married Frank Clarke. He didn't remember whether Cecil died or whether there was a divorce.
The marriage certificate of Ivy and Frank would resolve this.
On 17 February 2002 Graham George Hawker received an email from Jean Wint, which stated:
"Just had a fascinating time looking through the Hawker family information - my husband
(Ronald Wint) recognised his father Harold Wint with daughter Marjory in one of the unknown photos which was thought to be Thomas Hawker and Lilian. ... The photo of the young sailor which is thought to be Robert Hawker, Ron says is Roy, the son of Arthur Cecil and Ivy Hall. Roy was a submariner. Another query was whether Ivy Hall & Cecil divorced or Cecil died. Ron says they divorced."

Information sent to Graham Hawker by Nikki Lester in Septemeber 2008:
After Frank Clarke died, Ivy lived with Babs (Victoria Hawker, nee Hancock) at Coppice Farm,Teddesley and in Penkridge Staffs until she became ill and moved into a home.


William Henry Hawker

Ronald Wint's wife, Jean, in an email to Graham George Hawker on 26 January 2003 stated that:
I do not think he (Ron) remembers much about the Wint family as he was only 9 when he
went to live with his Uncle Bill Hawker,consequently he had no contact with
them afterwards."
This would be on the death of Ron's father in 1937 and the Uncle Bill Hawker would have been William Hawker, son of Thomas hawker and brother of Ron's mother Ellen Augusta Hawker.


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